Controlled Molecule Imaging

Unraveling the Structure‑Function Relationship in the Molecular Sciences

We develop innovative methods to obtain full control over large molecules and nanoparticles. These methods and the created controlled samples are exploited in fundamental physics and chemistry studies to unravel the underlying mechanisms of chemistry and biology by watching molecules at work.

Highlights

Forces in an optical funnel is selected as Editor's Choice and featured in Physics

11 December 2015

The manipulation of airborne micrometer-size particles by light is governed by photophoresis, a thermal force, which is due to uneven illumination of the particles. The more-illuminated side becomes slightly warmer and the resulting airflow around the particle pushes it away from the intensest light.

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CMI @ DESY Open Day and Hamburg Night of Knowledge 2015

07 November 2015

On Saturday 7th November, DESY opened its doors as part of the Hamburg-wide Night of Knowledge for more than 18,000 visitors, and with more than 9,500 visiting the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) on campus. The Controlled Molecule Imaging group (CMI) presented itself and our work with a number of fun experiments, as well as posters and a virtual lab tour.

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Femtochemistry conference kicks off in Hamburg

13 July 2015

Nobel laureate and femto pioneer Ahmed Zewail holds public scientific lecture — about 400 attendees.
At the 12th International Conference on Femtochemistry FEMTO12 — organizes by the CFEL Controlled Molecule Imaging Group — world leading experts gather at DESY in Hamburg this week. Femtochemistry deals with the ultrafast chemical interactions between molecules and atoms and is of fundamental importance for a broad spectrum of questions in many disciplines, from basic physics to biology and materials science.

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Synchronised rotations for novel investigations

10 March 2015

Members of the Controlled Molecule Imaging Group have resorted to a physical trick to persuade entire groups of molecules to perform synchronized cartwheels, virtually endlessly. This technique opens up new opportunities for imaging molecules and their chemical dynamics.

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